internal radiation therapy

Pronunciation: (in-TER-nul RAY-dee-AY-shun THAYR-uh-pee)

Internal radiation therapy is a form of radiation therapy where a sealed radioactive source is inserted into a body cavity, into a tumor directly, into tissue, or applied to the surface. This delivers a very high dose locally with a rapid fall-off of dose in the surrounding tissue. Internal radiation therapy can be done using several high-dose insertions (high-dose rate or HDR), leaving the source in place for many hours (low-dose rate or LDR), or leaving the source in permanently. Pulsed-dose rate (PDR) internal radiation therapy is an internal radiation therapy technique that combines the advantages of HDR technology of dose optimization and radiation safety with radiobiological advantages of LDR internal radiation therapy. Also called brachytherapy, implant radiation therapy, and radiation brachytherapy.

A type of radiation therapy in which radioactive material sealed in needles, seeds, wires, or catheters is placed directly into or near a tumor. Also called brachytherapy, implant radiation therapy, and radiation brachytherapy.

Source: NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms

Date last modified: 2007-08-19