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New tower expands, improves inpatient care for Siteman Cancer Center patients

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The newly completed Parkview Tower offers state-of-the-art accommodations for Siteman Cancer Center patients in need of hospital... The newly completed Parkview Tower offers state-of-the-art accommodations for Siteman Cancer Center patients in need of hospital care. Located at Siteman’s main location on the Washington University Medical Campus, the high-rise features private rooms, a rooftop garden and a family center with kitchen and business facilities, among other amenities.

The newly completed Parkview Tower offers state-of-the-art accommodations for Siteman Cancer Center patients in need of hospital care. Located at Siteman’s main location on the Washington University Medical Campus, the high-rise features private rooms, a rooftop garden and a family center with kitchen and business facilities, among other amenities.

With a new, state-of-the-art bed tower, Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis aims to enhance the care and comfort of oncology patients who require hospitalization.

The building, located at Siteman’s main location on the Washington University Medical Campus, consolidates and expands existing inpatient services. It also complements outpatient care provided at Siteman’s five outpatient facilities. The tower also serves patients of Siteman Cancer Network affiliates.

Private inpatient room
Private inpatient room

Named Parkview Tower, it offers cancer patients and their families private rooms – many with views of Forest Park, frequently named a top U.S. city park – and a rooftop garden that provides a calm and comfortable outdoor environment. Other features include dedicated corridors for patients and for medical and hospital staff members that are designed to reduce distractions and noise that can interfere with rest and recuperation. Washington University Physicians at Siteman will continue to provide care.

Patient and family quiet area
Patient and family quiet area

“As Siteman’s flagship cancer hospital, this facility welcomes people in need of inpatient oncology services, including those with complex cases who travel from across the country,” said Timothy Eberlein, MD, Siteman’s director. “Our patients deserve the very best, not only in terms of precision medicine, but in terms of patient- and family-centric care. For them, our new high-rise combines the latest technology with the most supportive environment possible.”

Patients begin moving into the tower in February. The facility includes 160 private rooms and 10 intensive care unit (ICU) beds for bone marrow transplantation. The 12-story, 558,000-square-foot tower also houses 15 inpatient ICU beds and 12 operating rooms for Siteman patients and patients of Barnes-Jewish Hospital. Built by campus partner BJC HealthCare, the high-rise is part of a $1 billion campus renewal plan announced in 2012.

Family Center
Family Center

“The design of these facilities is centered around the patient and also takes into account the experience of physicians, nurses and other caregivers, so they’re equipped to provide responsive, efficient care of the highest quality,” said Rich Liekweg, BJC HealthCare president and CEO.

Hundreds of patients, families, physicians, nurses, nonclinical staff members and others participated during the design phase, offering ideas about how people would use and experience spaces within the new building. Additional highlights are:

  • Private rooms were designed for the comfort of patients and with accommodations for family members. The building’s layout and orientation of patient rooms maximize views of Forest Park. Designers also evaluated how bed placement, light exposure and color would enhance the comfort of patients and the work environment of doctors and other caregivers.
  • “The lantern,” a lantern-like design element, provides indoor quiet areas with views of Forest Park and is a signature feature visible from the building’s exterior.
  • Physical therapy rooms on each floor include a treadmill, stationary bike and other exercise equipment, as well as views of the park.
  • In patient rooms, a touchscreen system allows patients to call for assistance or to order food and beverages from bed. Another system reads the badges of care providers and hospital staff who come into a patient’s room and identifies them by name on video monitors.
  • A family center provides kitchen facilities and a business lounge with free wireless internet and other amenities.
  • Themed art was selected for each floor that is intended to inspire conversations. Themes include: family time, vintage Americana and international flair, celebrating women’s spirit, and road trips out West.

“People, most especially our patients, are at the heart of these facilities,” said Paul J. Scheel Jr., MD, associate vice chancellor for clinical affairs at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and CEO of Washington University Physicians. “The design reflects this focus and, we believe, will help foster the very best care possible in an environment that is comfortable and reassuring for patients and their families.”


Siteman Cancer Center, ranked among the top cancer treatment centers by U.S. News & World Report, also is one of only a few cancer centers in the U.S. to receive the highest rating of the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Comprising the cancer research, prevention and treatment programs of Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Siteman is Missouri’s only NCI- designated Comprehensive Cancer Center and the state’s only member of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

Siteman Cancer Network, an affiliation of Siteman Cancer Center in St. Louis and and regional health systems and hospitals, is committed to improving the health and well-being of individuals and communities through research, treatment and prevention efforts. Together, the network and its affiliates work to expand access to cancer prevention and control strategies, clinical studies and genomic and genetic testing, all aimed at reducing the burden of cancer.